Infernal Ramblings
A Malaysian Perspective on Politics, Society and Economics

Song - Real Love

Written by johnleemk on 11:20:27 am May 3, 2005.
Categories:


  • Lyrics10 out of 10

  • Melody10 out of 10

  • Clarity8 out of 10

  • Instruments10 out of 10


My first review of a song ever. "Real Love" was recorded by the Beatles around the mid-90s, using an original tape made by John Lennon before his death. If you don't know who the Beatles or John Lennon are, Wikipedia or Google is quite handy for this. This song appears on the Beatles' Anthology 2 album, and was also released as a single in the United Kingdom and the United States.

Now, I find this song to be quite underrated; Salon.com's review, for example, declares it "may not rank with such masterpieces as 'Penny Lane'". The charts also agree with this assessment; in the UK, it peaked at #4, while in the US, "Real Love" never got higher than #11.

Even so, this seems to be a bit of a closet favourite in the hearts of some Beatles fans out there. A straw poll on beatles-discography.com's forum indicates perhaps 3 out of 15 voters named this as their favourite song. Not bad considering this is one out of 200 possible choices.

Alright, I'll cut to the chase. This is my favourite song of all time. In my opinion, it's the best Beatles song ever, and indeed, the best song ever devised by human beings in the past century.

I'll start with the lyrics, since that's what really hooked me on this song. You can find them (with a brief history) here. You can hit the end key on your keyboard to view the lyrics if you're lazy like I am. The lyrics are deceptively simple, yet quite possibly the most meaningful of a love song that I've ever seen. Here's a couple of lines, for example, that I really love: "From this moment on I know / exactly where my life will go / Seems that all I really was doing was waiting for love / Don't need to be afraid / No need to be afraid / It's real love, it's real". To me, the song depicts exactly what real love is like, even though I don't think I've ever experienced it before. It just sounds so... real.

The melody and tune are perfect as well. I can't think of a better tune the Beatles have ever invented. Catchier, of course, many more catchy tunes have been spawned from the Lennon/McCartney partnership, but better? I don't think so. It's just...brilliant. Words cannot describe it.

However, I found the sound clarity to be a bit lacking. John Lennon's vocals are a bit unclear at points (and my mother tells me she has no idea what any of the lyrics are saying). Even so, this doesn't detract much from the overall beauty of the song.

The instruments are one thing I shouldn't forget either; I love them. The drumming fits nicely with the guitar fills, and when you turn the volume really high, their richness is quite overpowering.

All in all, a nice medium-paced love song. I'm not sure of my qualifications for this or whether the Beatles should take this as a compliment or an insult, but this song gets two thumbs-up from me. A real gem that's frequently underrated and overlooked.


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